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Laxey to Gansey

The walk from Laxey on the east coast to Gansey Point in the south measures a coastal distance of approximately 30 miles and passes through the coastal towns of Douglas and Castletown.

Waypoints
Laxey Harbour WP1: SC 442 838
Groudle Glen WP2: SC 420 784
Onchan Head WP3: SC 417 778
Douglas Head WP4: SC 389 747
Port Soderick WP5: SC 346 726
Port Grenaugh WP6: SC 316 705
Santon Gorge WP7: SC 300 693
Derbyhaven WP8: SC 285 678
Castletown Harbour WP9: SC 266 675
Scarlett Point WP10: SC 258 664
Gansey Point WP11: SC 215 681

Waypoint markers

The waypoints supplied above are for information only and should not be used for navigation purposes without consulting the relevant maps.

Maps

The maps supplied (see downloadable documents) are intended as a visual guide only and not as a navigational aid. OS 25,000 Isle of Man official guide maps are also supplied as a downloadable file.

Marine wildlife

Sea birds

Marine Drive is important for nesting peregrine, fulmar and gulls whilst a cormorant colony is often sited at Pistol Castle. Langness supports a range of wintering waders and wildfowl and high numbers of oystercatchers. Chough and raven nest all along this stretch of coast.

Seals

Seals are present in Manx waters all year round and are more sensitive to disturbance between September and November during their breeding season, especially when they have young.

Porpoises, dolphins and whales

Porpoises can be seen all year round and are more sensitive to disturbance in the summer months when they have young. Risso’s dolphins are sighted along the east coast in spring and the south coast in autumn, often in groups. Bottlenose dolphins are less common but groups of 200 individuals have been seen off Douglas and Laxey in winter. Minke whales are sighted along the east coast in autumn. They grow up to 10 metres in length and occasionally jump clear of the water, so keep your distance. Other species of whales and dolphins are also seen around the Manx coast.

Basking sharks

Every summer, from May until September the Isle of Man is a hotspot for basking sharks. Keep a look out for basking sharks all around the Island. You may see their huge dorsal fin but they often swim just below the surface too. If one is visible, others may be close by.          

Safe bathing and no wake zones/harbour areas

Laxey

No Wake Zone/Harbour Area: is bound by a line from the seaward end of the breakwaters.

Safe Bathing Area: is bound by a line from the end of the outer breakwater to Gob-y-Rheynn.

Douglas

No Wake Zone/Harbour Area: is bound by a line joining the seaward end of the breakwater to No 1 Green Buoy to the tower of refuge to the Connister Jetty.

Safe Bathing Area: is bound to seaward by a line joining the Jubilee Clock and Summerland. The Northern and Southern limits are lines extending seaward intersecting the seaward boundary at right angles. The northern limit extends from the War Memorial.

Castletown

No Wake Zone/Harbour Area: is bound by a line joining King Williams College Tower and the Bell Buoy and a line joining Castle Rushen Keep and the Bell Buoy and includes the harbour.

Safe Bathing Area: is north of a line extending eastwards from the harbour starboard end beacon to the tower of the hotel on Langness.

Bay Ny Carrickey (including Port St Mary)

No Wake Zone/Harbour Area: is north west of a line from the seaward end of the Alfred Pier to the daymark on the Carthure Rocks.

Safe Bathing Area 1: Chapel Bay, is bound by a line across the narrowest part of the entrance to the bay.

Safe Bathing Area 2: within a line joining Gansey Point, the daymark on the Carthure Rocks and a point 150 metres west of the slipway adjacent to the Shore Hotel. The eastern boundary is marked by a line of yellow

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